Architecture and Obsolescent, an undesirable reality

02Jul12

Phillip G. Bernstein Talks About the Future of Design

Autodesk’s vice president of strategic industry relations talks about the future and shares how architects can avoid obsolescence.

By Wanda Lau

Building information modeling (BIM) has been ingrained into the vocabulary of design firms around the world, but the degree to which it isimplemented varies widely. Its debut into the mainstream practice in the early 2000s coincided with the rapid digitization of building tools, leaving many firms grappling for strategies to integrate and implement these technological advancementseffectively.

Phillip G. Bernstein, FAIA, vice president of strategic industry relations at Autodesk, lecturer at Yale School of Architecture, and coauthor of BIM in Academia (Yale, 2011), sat down with ARCHITECT to discuss where the building industry is going and what architects can do to survive.

How will improvements in design and construction efficiency due to tools such as BIM affect jobs?
The nature of the building industry work will be different. Design work will be about model-based representation analysis. Construction work will be about model-based construction management. Larger components of building will be pre-manufactured or mass-customized, which means skill sets in the field are going to change. More construction work will happen on factory floors instead of on jobsites.

Across disciplines, there’s going to be some integration of practices … and a demographic shift in the practice of architecture. With the emergence of these very large-scale, super-integrated firms with somewhat ambiguous missions, there’s going to be pressure on mid-sized design practices. There’s going to be a consolidation, and mid-market contractors may find themselves gone because in order to play at a certain scale, you’re going to need a certain-scale business set.

Read the full article here

Advertisements


No Responses Yet to “Architecture and Obsolescent, an undesirable reality”

  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: