CAD is a lie

17Dec15

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Generative design to the rescue

Repeating things for decades doesn’t make them true. I can prove this pretty easily because, for more than 50 years now, people thought CAD was an acronym for computer-aided design.
But it’s time to face facts. It really stands for computer-aided documentation.

The computer doesn’t aid your design. The design is in your head, and you just use the computer to document it.

So what’s been standing in the way of real computer-aided design all of these years?  It’s the way people always use computers – as passive tools for execution, waiting for people to tell them what to do.

So how can the computer be used for something more? How can it become our partner in exploration?

The newfound abilities of computers to be more creative and learn are making this idea a reality.

Generative design

Computers that creatively come up with ideas on their own are the heart of generative design.

In generative design, you share your goal with the computer, tell it what you want to achieve, as well as the constraints involved, and the computer actually explores the solution space to find and create ideas that you would never think of on your own.

Antenna designed by NASA in the 1960s.
Antenna designed by NASA in the 1960s.

An example. The photo is an antenna designed by NASA in the 1960s. It went out on space missions, was designed by an engineer, and was considered an elegant, high-performance design.

About a decade ago, engineers developed an algorithm that created and analysed thousands of possible antenna designs, automatically simulated their performance, and progressively evolved them to achieve higher-performing solutions.

This process resulted in the design below and, although it looks kind of strange, it performs twice as well as the earlier one.

In 1915, biologist D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson said, “The form of an object is a diagram of its forces.”

Although it may look strange, the antenna  performs twice as well as the earlier one.
Although it may look strange, the antenna performs twice as well as the earlier one.

I think that’s actually kind of beautiful and, 100 years later, Autodesk is adopting his concept quite literally with Dreamcatcher – our research project that lets designers describe the forces – structural loads or even manufacturing methods – that act on an object and then lets computers go off and make it.

Let’s say I wanted to design a roll hoop for a Formula One race car. It’s that part right behind the driver’s head.

Previously, you would start with an idea, design it in the computer, and then test it to see how it works with analysis software—and that is all for one design.

With Dreamcatcher, you start by sharing the goal with the computer, telling it not what you want it to do, but what you are trying to achieve.

You describe your well-stated problem and then, using generative methods, the computer creates a large set of potential solutions, automatically synthesising them using cloud computing.

A roll hoop for a Formula One race car, located just behind the driver’s head.
A roll hoop for a Formula One race car, located just behind the driver’s head.

But here’s the key – in the time it would have taken you to do just one design, Dreamcatcher has done all of them.

Its design proposals are delivered back to you in an explore tool, and you can then start steering through the various designs and understanding the trade-offs between various solutions.

This process may enable you to find something interesting, helping you redefine the problem again so you can repeat the loop, but, ultimately, you’re going to select one of the computer’s designs to fabricate.

For this roll-hoop example, the computer downloads the spec sheet of a Formula One car from Google and reads the specifications itself using natural language processing.

It translates the specs and then starts generating all of the designs. At that point, I’m back in the design explorer, and I can just go from design to design, and look at trade-offs between parts and costs, as well as changing materials.

A generatively designed roll hoop, with no human input.
A generatively designed roll hoop, with no human input.

 

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